Youth Sports

Lessons for Sports Parents

Although well intentioned, many youth sports parents approach their athlete’s sports in a manner that is more detrimental than helpful.  I’ve learned a few valuable lessons about youth sports parents: Parents – You had your chance, now it’s your child’s turn. Their path may be different than yours but allow them to lead their own way rather than fitting into your plans or expectations. Athletes really don’t want you coaching from the sidelines. It can contradict and distract from the…

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The Trident Effect

The beauty of coaching young athletes is seeing the results of their work, their parents’ work and the coach’s work. However, it takes 100 percent commitment on everyone’s behalf in order for this to happen. Coaches Coach, Parents Parent and Players Play. I call this the Trident effect. Each one of these components make up the Parents-Players-Coaches Trident and provides the stability necessary to have a positive impact. I’ve seen many instances where the Trident is weakened because of minimal, ineffective…

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“One More”

In the world of sports, there is a term called “one more.” This is the one extra rep that you do before moving on to the next exercise. This is the same for sales reps. “One more door knock,” “one more phone call,” “one more closing question,” “one more referral”… It’s the above-the-call-of-duty actions that will vault you to the top of your field. It is a key strategy in the sales industry, however this concept can be applied to any…

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Parental Support

The best line that you can say after your son or daughter’s sporting event is: “I LOVE YOU and I AM PROUD OF YOU.”  This statement shows that you have unconditional love and appreciation for your child regardless of what happened on the sports field and your support will never change. In today’s society, we put too much pressure on young athletes to score a goal, hit a homerun, beat the last time on the clock, make the save, or…

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Parental Roles in Youth Sports

Parents “parent,” Players “play,” and Coaches “coach.”  This formula will not work if anyone decides to cross the line into someone else’s role. The athlete is the one most affected and the number one reason everyone is there, yet that focus is sometimes lost.  The parents, players and coaches should work together on a performance plan that ensures there is direction and open communication.  Parents should surround their athlete with the proper resources, which includes people who will be open,…

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An Athlete’s Foundation

Parents, Athletes and Coaches… A broken process means a broken foundation. You can’t fix what you don’t admit is broken. This takes a very honest approach and no ego. Ask for help in rebuilding the foundation to ensure positive change and proper direction.

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